Making Headlines

National Geographic, May 5, 2021

If the world’s largest carbon polluters don’t cut emissions more aggressively, Antarctic ice melt could speed up dramatically around the middle of this century, triggering “rapid and unstoppable” sea-level rise for hundreds of years to come, a new modeling study has found. ...

Coshocton Tribune, May 3, 2021

A research and arts project to document how eastern Ohio has been shaped by changes in the coal industry was awarded a $35,000 grant from the Sustainability Institute at Ohio State University. ...

Smart Cities Dive, May 3, 2021

When the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) at Ohio State University began over 30 years ago, it focused on traditional subjects like the transmissions, noise and vibrations from internal combustion engines, with some attention paid to what was then a growing trend of automotive electronics. ...

Washington Post, April 28, 2021

Glaciers are melting faster, losing 31% more snow and ice per year than they did 15 years earlier, according to three-dimensional satellite measurements of all the world’s mountain glaciers. ...

Dayton Daily News, April 22, 2021

Dayton’s elected leaders have declared a “climate emergency” and pledged to transition electric consumption in the city to all renewable sources in coming decades. ...

Columbus Dispatch, April 21, 2021

Central Ohioans woke up to a blanket of snow Wednesday morning with areas seeing as much as five inches accumulated. ...

Miami Herald, April 15, 2021

Early in the pandemic, scientists learned they can study wastewater samples to predict COVID-19 community outbreaks by searching for viral particles in poop. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University say they’ve found an easier, cheaper — and less smelly — alternative: dust. ...

WKBN, March 31, 2021

An antiquated regulation on milk freshness labeling is holding back the Pennsylvania dairy industry, state lawmakers say. ...

WKBN, March 31, 2021

A recently introduced bill in the Ohio House aims to deregulate ephemeral waters, following changes at a federal level last year. ...

Columbus Dispatch, March 28, 2021

During World Wars I and II, victory gardens tended by families in their backyards and in urban lots throughout the United States produced an estimated 40% of all fruits and vegetables consumed by Americans. This mobilization was needed for several reasons, including food rationing and shortages; labor shortages; which disrupted food harvesting; processing and marketing; and a scarcity of steel needed for canned foods. Sound familiar? ...